Tag Archives: entertainment

Oscars 2013 – Winners

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Oscars 2013… And the Winners are:

Best Motion Picture: Argo

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Achievement in Directing: Ang Lee, Life of Pi

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Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role: Daniel Day-Lewis, Lincoln

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Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role: Jennifer Lawrence, Silver Linings Playbook

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Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role: Christoph Waltz, Django Unchained

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Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role: Anne Hathaway, Les Miserables

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Adapted Screenplay: Argo, Chris Terrio

Original Screenplay: Django Unchained, Quentin Tarantino

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Original Score: Life of Pi, Mychael Danna

Original Song: “Skyfall,” Adele Adkins & Paul Epworth; Skyfall

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Best Animated Feature Film: Brave

Best Animated Short Film: Paperman

Achievement in Cinematography: Life of Pi, Claudio Miranda

Achievement in Visual Effects: Life of Pi

Achievement in Costume Design: Anna Karenina, Jacqueline Durran

Achievement in Makeup & Hairstyling: Les Misérables

Best Live-Action Short Film: Curfew

Best Documentary Short Subject: Inocente

Best Documentary Feature: Searching for Sugar Man

Best Foreign-Language Film: Amour (Austria)

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Achievement in Sound Mixing: Les Misérables

Achievement in Sound Editing: Zero Dark Thirty & Skyfall

Achievement in Film Editing: Argo

Achievement in Production Direction: Lincoln

Mooooo

xxx

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Fall

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This gorgeous time-lapse by filmmaker Jamie Scott starts off like any other video capturing the change of the seasons with the movement of the sun, but then around :30 something pretty remarkable happens. To create the effect Scott filmed in 15 locations around New York City’s Central Park, two times a week, for six months using the exact same tripod and camera lens settings resulting in the footage you see here.

Mooooo

xxx

 

Halloween London Zombie Walk

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Halloween or Hallowe’en (a contraction of “All Hallows’ Evening”), also known as All Hallows’ Eve, is a yearly celebration observed in a number of countries on October 31, the eve of the Western Christian feast of All Hallows (or All Saints). According to many scholars, it was originally influenced by western European harvest festivals and festivals of the dead with possible pagan roots, particularly the Celtic Samhain. Others maintain that it originated independently of Samhain and has Christian roots.
Typical festive Halloween activities include trick-or-treating (also known as “guising”), attending costume parties, carving pumpkins into jack-o’-lanterns, lighting bonfires, apple bobbing, visiting haunted attractions, playing pranks, telling scary stories, and watching horror films.

In London has a Zombie walk to celebrate Halloween for 6 consecutive years. As well as the walk itself……….when walking from pub to pub, you should also act and behave like a zombie.

I have participate on the last 3 years and its great fun, everyone makes a big effort to actually look like a zombie and they give prizes for the best dressed.

Here are some pictures of the London Zombie Walk VI

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Happy Halloween!!!

Mooooo

xxx

What If Money Was No Object?

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An amazing lecture from the late Alan Watts.

Mooooo

xxx

Animated Gifs

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Matthew Divito is a Boston-based designer who produces some of the cleverest gifs I’ve seen. Reminiscent of Seventies psychedelic poster art, they mix geometric forms and contrasting colours. They’re also silent so your boss will just think you’re deeply involved in that urgent appraisal form.

Check it out at http://mrdiv.tumblr.com/

Mooooo

xxx

Vintage Tech Cast in Concrete

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20,000 years from now, what will the future generations of archeologists be digging up? While the obvious food item would be the long-lived Twinkie, technology wise there are a ton of interesting items to puzzle future researchers. I mean, what the heck are they going to think of USB cables and iPads?

Going a little back in time from our current era, the people at Bughouse have created what they call “Future Fossils” out of cast cement. The individually cast and color stained pieces represent some of the most desirable and iconic hardware from days gone by, from the Atari joystick, to the twin lens Rolleiflex and the Olympus OM-1. The life-sized sculptures are sure to stick around for quite a while… and look very good doing it too.

Each piece is available for between $65 and $125 (excepting the large and complex turntable which goes for a cool $495), making them more expensive, but longer lived than there fully functional brethren (maybe with the exception of their plastic bits). For more info and a load of other highly desirable and available art, check out the LA based art and design studio Bughouse.

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Mooooo

xxx

The “Fright Complex” by Alfred Hitchcock

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In May of 1964, BBC’s Huw Weldon interviewed iconic film director Alfred Hitchcock for the TV program Monitor. Brilliantly insightful and ever-so-subtly condescending as ever, the great filmmaker shares priceless insights on the social psychology of fear, the gender balance of film audiences, and ratio of intuition vs. calculation in American and English cinema.

It’s all based on Red Riding Hood, you see. Nothing has changed since Red Riding Hood. So what [audiences] are frightened of today is exactly the same thing they were frightened of yesterday. Because this…shall we call it ‘fright complex’…is rooted in every individual.” ~ Alfred Hitchcock

The assembly of pieces of film to create fright is the essential part of my job, just as much would a painter, by putting certain colors together, create evil on canvas.” ~ Alfred Hitchcock

[A good cry] is the satisfaction of temporary pain. And that’s the same thing when people endure the agonies of a suspense film — when it’s all over, they’re relieved.” ~ Alfred Hitchcock

For more of the iconic director, I highly recommend Alfred Hitchcock: The Masterpiece Collection — an ambitious collection of 14 digitally remastered Hitchcock gems, accompanied by fascinating documentaries, featurettes, commentary and a collectible book, and encased in stunningly designed velvet packaging.

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Mooooo

xxx

Satirical Illustrations

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Polish illustrator Pawel Kuczynski cleverly uses satire to portray today’s social, political and cultural reality.

At first sight, his illustrations might seem funny, but when you look closer, they actually show some serious problems of today’s world.

Born in 1976, Pawel is a graduate of Fine Arts Academy in Poznan. The artist began drawing satirical illustrations back in 2004, and so far has been “rewarded with 92 prizes and distinctions“. In 2005, Pawel Kuszynski received “Eryk” award from Association of Polish Cartoonists for getting a record number of awards in international competitions.

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Mooooo

xxx

Darth Vader and Son

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What if “Luke, I am your father” wasn’t the beginning and end of pop culture’s tensest father-son relationship? That’s the premise of comic artist Jeffrey Brown’s Darth Vader and Son — a sweet, funny, charmingly illustrated story that imagines an alternate universe in which the Dark Lord of the Sith actually raises his son. From potty training to lightsaber batting practice to ice cream runs, the endearing absurdity of the duo’s dynamic makes for a remix treat of the most entertaining variety.

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“Er, he looks just like you, Lord Vader!”

Mooooo

xxx

Music: Ways of Listening

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Music has a powerful grip on our emotional brain. It can breathe new life into seemingly lifeless minds. But if there is indeed no music instinct, music — not just its creation, but also its consumption — must be an acquired skill. How, then, do we “learn” music beyond merely understanding how it works? How do we “learn” to “listen” to music, something that seems so fundamental we take it for granted?

From the wonderful vintage book Music: Ways of Listening, originally published in 1982, comes this outline of the seven essential skills of perceptive listening, which author and composer Elliott Schwartz argues have been “dulled by our built-in twentieth-century habit of tuning out” and thus need to be actively developed. Perhaps most interestingly, you can substitute “reading” for “listening” and “writing” for “music,” and the list would be just as valuable and insightful, and just as needed an antidote to the dulling of our modern modes of information consumption.

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1- Develop your sensitivity to music. Try to respond esthetically to all sounds, from the hum of the refrigerator motor or the paddling of oars on a lake, to the tones of a cello or muted trumpet. When we really hear sounds, we may find them all quite expressive, magical and even ‘beautiful.’ On a more complex level, try to relate sounds to each other in patterns: the successive notes in a melody, or the interrelationships between an ice cream truck jingle and nearby children’s games.

2 – Time is a crucial component of the musical experience. Develop a sense of time as it passes: duration, motion, and the placement of events within a time frame. How long is thirty seconds, for example? A given duration of clock-time will feel very different if contexts of activity and motion are changed.

3 – Develop a musical memory. While listening to a piece, try to recall familiar patterns, relating new events to past ones and placing them all within a durational frame. This facility may take a while to grow, but it eventually will. And once you discover that you can use your memory in this way, just as people discover that they really can swim or ski or ride a bicycle, life will never be the same.

4 – If we want to read, write or talk about music, we must acquire a working vocabulary. Music is basically a nonverbal art, and its unique events and effects are often too elusive for everyday words; we need special words to describe them, however inadequately.

5 – Try to develop musical concentration, especially when listening to lengthy pieces. Composers and performers learn how to fill different time-frames in appropriate ways, using certain gestures and patterns for long works and others for brief ones. The listener must also learn to adjust to varying durations. It may be easy to concentrate on a selection lasting a few minutes, but virtually impossible to maintain attention when confronted with a half-hour Beethoven symphony or a three-hour Verdi opera.
Composers are well aware of this problem. They provide so many musical landmarks and guidelines during the course of a long piece that, even if listening ‘focus’ wanders, you an tell where you are.

[…]

6 – Try to listen objectively and dispassionately. Concentrate upon ‘what’s there,’ and not what you hope or wish would be there. At the early stages of directed listening, when a working vocabulary for music is being introduced, it is important that you respond using that vocabulary as often as possible. In this way you can relate and compare pieces that present different styles, cultures and centuries. Try to focus upon ‘what’s there,’ in an objective sense, and don’t be dismayed if a limited vocabulary restricts your earliest responses.
[…]

7 – Bring experience and knowledge to the listening situation. That includes not only your concentration and growing vocabulary, but information about the music itself: its composer, history and social context. Such knowledge makes the experience of listening that much more enjoyable.

There may appear to be a conflict between this suggestion and the previous one, in which listeners were urged to focus just on ‘what’s there.’ Ideally, it would be fascinating to hear a new piece of music with fresh expectations and truly innocent ears, as though we were Martians. But such objectivity doesn’t exist. All listeners approach a new piece with ears that have been ‘trained’ by prejudices, personal experiences and memories. Some of these may get in the way of listening to music. Try to replace these with other items that might help focus upon the work, rather than individual feelings. Of course, the ‘work’ is much more than the sounds heard at any one sitting in a concert hall; it also consists of previous performances, recorded performances, the written notes on manuscript paper, and all the memories, reviews and critiques of these written notes and performances, ad infinitum. In acquiring information about any of these factors, we are simply broadening our total awareness of the work itself.

Mooooo

xxx