Tag Archives: Paint

“My White Trash Family”

Standard

For the past ten years Philadelphia-based artist Kim Alsbrooks has been painting miniature portraits on trash. Her series “My White Trash Family” began when she became interested in historical biases in art, and specifically portraits painted during the watercolor on ivory era (17th-18th century).

Alsbrooks has produced over 600 paintings since it started. All beverage cans are pre-flattened, mostly by passing cars or trucks, and chooses a portrait to fit each specific piece of trash. She gessoes them, draws the image in graphite, paints with oils and varnishes.

Have a look at a selection of her paintings below.

kimalsbrooks-whitetrash-01 kimalsbrooks-whitetrash-02 kimalsbrooks-whitetrash-03 kimalsbrooks-whitetrash-04 kimalsbrooks-whitetrash-05 kimalsbrooks-whitetrash-06 kimalsbrooks-whitetrash-07 kimalsbrooks-whitetrash-08 kimalsbrooks-whitetrash-09 kimalsbrooks-whitetrash-10 kimalsbrooks-whitetrash-11 kimalsbrooks-whitetrash-12 kimalsbrooks-whitetrash-13

Mooooo

xxx

via artnau

Advertisements

Realistic Body Art

Standard

 

20120725-120913.jpg

Japanese art student Chooo-San, aged 19, uses only acrylic paint and her incredible talent to transform herself into a mutant or cyborg. Multiple mouths, six eyes or even batteries protruding from her forearms – these are just a few examples of what she can do with a human body.

Everything began when Chooo-San was studying for university admission exams. She would draw eyes and other objects on her hands while taking breaks from her studies.

Finally, she took her hobby a step further and created a portfolio of her realistic body paintings. The results look incredibly promising.

20120725-121134.jpg

20120725-121139.jpg

20120725-121143.jpg

20120725-121147.jpg

20120725-121152.jpg

20120725-121157.jpg

20120725-121201.jpg

Mooooo

xxx

 

The Lost Art of Brazilian Photograph Painting

Standard

20120530-101746.jpg

Throughout the late 19th century up until the 1990s, these captivating and strangely painted portraits (retratos pintados) were a common practice in rural northeastern Brazil. Family portraits were retouched with a heavy hand, painting over the original image with bold brush strokes which transformed family members into the rich, healthy and beautiful… even the dead ones.

The images are part of historian Titus Riedl’s collection of the images displayed in his book Retratos Pintados. Throughout the period when these images were being created, street-traders (called bonequeiros) would commonly attract clients in remote rural villages, then with images in hand, they would travel to bigger towns where they would hand over the materials to puxadores who would enlarge the photographs. Then painters, often in small, improvised studios, would create the final image. Returning to the original village, often weeks later, the image was finally delivered to the client.

With the advent of modern technology and the lack of readily available photo paper, the unique tradition has largely died out. It has now been replaced with modern digital techniques like Photoshop and printed on inkjet printers… often with an elaborate phone card, postcard or screensaver motif as their background. For more about these unique pieces of cultural history, see the interview with Martin Parr (who wrote the intro to Riedl’s book) at themorningnews.org.

20120530-101824.jpg

20120530-101830.jpg

20120530-101835.jpg

20120530-101839.jpg

20120530-101844.jpg

20120530-101848.jpg

20120530-101853.jpg

20120530-101858.jpg

20120530-101903.jpg

Mooooo

xxx

Floppy Disk Art Portraits

Standard

London-based artist Nick Gentry paints on recycled floppy disks.

20120419-151718.jpg

20120419-151743.jpg

20120419-151800.jpg

20120419-151820.jpg

20120419-151842.jpg

UK artist Nick Gentry has been quite busy lately, completing a number of his trademark portraits painted on a canvas of old 3 1⁄2″ floppy disks. Check out the video for a montage of recent and older works.

Mooooo

xxx